theminimalist-show:

“Members of the Young Women’s Republican Club of Milford, Conn., explored the pleasures of tobacco, poker, the strip tease and such other masculine enjoyments as had frequently cost them the evening companionship of husbands, sons and brothers.” 1941 (x)

theminimalist-show:

“Members of the Young Women’s Republican Club of Milford, Conn., explored the pleasures of tobacco, poker, the strip tease and such other masculine enjoyments as had frequently cost them the evening companionship of husbands, sons and brothers.” 1941 (x)

(via thealogie)

crysticify:

flash-thunder:

#that’s what you think dmitri #sorry but you thought lenin was bad #ahhaha well look out for the 1940s #just you wait dmitri #what year is it huh? #early 1930s maybe #just you wait dmitri #you live in russia during the 20th century #it’s not gonna be fine #history’s a bitch dmitri

#HISTORY’S A BITCH DMITRI
I am screaming

For me, nothing compares to the end of Fiddler on the Roof when Chava and Fyedka are all like “We can’t take the way Russia treats the Jews! …So we’re going to go to Poland.”
 

crysticify:

flash-thunder:

#that’s what you think dmitri #sorry but you thought lenin was bad #ahhaha well look out for the 1940s #just you wait dmitri #what year is it huh? #early 1930s maybe #just you wait dmitri #you live in russia during the 20th century #it’s not gonna be fine #history’s a bitch dmitri

#HISTORY’S A BITCH DMITRI

I am screaming

For me, nothing compares to the end of Fiddler on the Roof when Chava and Fyedka are all like “We can’t take the way Russia treats the Jews! …So we’re going to go to Poland.”

 

(Source: idaholm, via musainrules)

polepixie:

quantumaviator:

merlinus-caledonensis:

pappasaur:

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

Don’t forget that the church was literally so impressed they gave him a medal instead of imprisoning him or executing him

Mozart only needed to hear a piece once to play it better than the original. And on top of that, they believed all his music to have been created by someone else, not this kid, so they locked him in a tower for a period of time (forget how long) with only music paper. When they came back all the paper was filled and he had written on the walls as well. AND ALL THE MUSIC WAS PHENOMENAL. how much more perfect can you get than Mozart? If you want to know more: watch the movie Amadeus. It’s historically accurate but also funny at times. Watch. it.

so he was the first to illegally download a song

And for those of you that would like to hear the first illegally downloaded song that the Vatican kept a secret for so long because it was “too beautiful for human knowledge” You can find it here.

polepixie:

quantumaviator:

merlinus-caledonensis:

pappasaur:

nowyoukno:

Source for more facts follow NowYouKno

Don’t forget that the church was literally so impressed they gave him a medal instead of imprisoning him or executing him

Mozart only needed to hear a piece once to play it better than the original. And on top of that, they believed all his music to have been created by someone else, not this kid, so they locked him in a tower for a period of time (forget how long) with only music paper. When they came back all the paper was filled and he had written on the walls as well. AND ALL THE MUSIC WAS PHENOMENAL. how much more perfect can you get than Mozart? If you want to know more: watch the movie Amadeus. It’s historically accurate but also funny at times. Watch. it.

so he was the first to illegally download a song

And for those of you that would like to hear the first illegally downloaded song that the Vatican kept a secret for so long because it was “too beautiful for human knowledge” You can find it here.

(via nowyoukno)

peashooter85:

Garum —- The official condiment of the ancient Roman Empire

In the ancient Roman world a salty, oily condiment made from fermented fish guts took the Roman Empire by storm.  Called garum, it became an important commodity all over the empire, providing fats, protein, salts, vitamin, minerals, and most importantly flavor to places in the empire were little could be found.  Originally a Greek creation, the Roman obsession with garum would propel the fish sauce to become the most popular condiment in the Roman Empire.

Our modern society is a very wasteful society, we take it for granted that we can just use something and throw it away.  However, our ancestors had a completely different attitude.  Nothing went to waste and everything was put to use.  “Waste not, want not” was not simply a saying, but a mantra that meant life or death, prosperity or disaster for ancient people’s.  So if an animal was slaughtered, it was guaranteed that every part was consumed or used in some way. 

Garum was a result of this culture.  When the fishmongers gutted the daily catch, the guts were not merely thrown away, rather they were gathered by the garum maker.  The guts were coated with salt, layered in large urns, and left out to heat in the sun for one to three months.  During this time the ingredients would liquefy and ferment, forming a thick paste.  When ready, a clear amber colored fluid would separate for the thicker material.  This clear fluid was pure garum, and was skimmed, bolted, and sold for a hefty price.  The skimming of more fluid would lead to cloudier and less pure forms of garum, which were much cheaper.  The remaining paste was called “allum”, and was sold as a budget “poor mans garum sauce”.  All grades of garum were flavored with different herbs and spices, depending on local tastes.

Because the Roman Empire was centered in the Mediterranean, the Roman economy was also heavily dependent on fishing.  Numerous fisheries and ports dotted all along the Mediterranean coast, and where there fisheries, there were garum makers.  Usually, however, the garum makers were relegated to the outskirts of a city, as the process of garum making tended to create an enormous stench.  Garum itself became one of the most important commodities of the Roman world, being shipped all over Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa.  It was issued regularly as rations for Roman soldiers and was even accepted as money.  Garum was also valued for its medicinal value; used to treat dog bites, diarrhea, ulcers, dysentery, to remove unwanted hair, and to remove freckles.

Alas the fall of the Roman Empire would lead to the fall of garum, especially as Germanic peoples who turned their noses at fermented fish sauce settled Europe and carved out kingdoms from the former Roman Empire.  Today garum still can be found, though only produced by small business who cater to specialty gourmet foods.  At around the same time the Romans were making garum, peoples in Southeast Asia were making a remarkably similar fish sauce called  nước mắm, which today is still widely popular in Vietnamese, Thai, and Cambodian cuisine.

(Source: Wikipedia, via bleep0bleep)

lady-tyrell:

enjolux:

theplaceinsidetheblizzard:

elgin-marbles:

coleytangerina:

Some graffiti found in Pompeii’s ruins: 
Weep, you girls. My penis has given you up. Now it penetrates men’s behinds. Goodbye, wondrous femininity!
Restituta, take off your tunic, please, and show us your hairy privates.
I screwed the barmaid.
Apollinaris, the doctor of the emperor Titus, defecated well here.
I screwed a lot of girls here.
Sollemnes, you screw well!
Theophilus, don’t perform oral sex on girls against the city wall like a dog.
Nice to see nothing has changed.


There is a website with all of the graffiti

I love this.




I am laughing so hard


someone basically wrote “secundus is gay” on the wall humankind has not changed at all

lady-tyrell:

enjolux:

theplaceinsidetheblizzard:

elgin-marbles:

coleytangerina:

Some graffiti found in Pompeii’s ruins: 

  • Weep, you girls. My penis has given you up. Now it penetrates men’s behinds. Goodbye, wondrous femininity!
  • Restituta, take off your tunic, please, and show us your hairy privates.
  • I screwed the barmaid.
  • Apollinaris, the doctor of the emperor Titus, defecated well here.
  • I screwed a lot of girls here.
  • Sollemnes, you screw well!
  • Theophilus, don’t perform oral sex on girls against the city wall like a dog.

Nice to see nothing has changed.

image

There is a website with all of the graffiti

I love this.

I am laughing so hard

image

someone basically wrote “secundus is gay” on the wall humankind has not changed at all

(Source: creepyabandonedplaces, via musainrules)

archaeologicalnews:

image

As archaeologists continue to clear dirt and stone slabs from the entrance of a huge tomb in Greece, excitement is building over what excavators may find inside.

The monumental burial complex — which dates back to the fourth century B.C., during the era of…

dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos

dreadpiratekhan:


A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

(via gingerhaze)

"As Arnold points out, there is an otherwise inexplicable shift in direction in the Piccadilly line passing east out of South Kensington. “In fact,” she writes, “the tunnel curves between Knightsbridge and South Kensington stations because it was impossible to drill through the mass of skeletal remains buried in Hyde Park.” I will admit that I think she means “between Knightsbridge and Hyde Park Corner”—although there is apparently a “small plague pit dating from around 1664” beneath Knightsbridge Green—but I will defer to Arnold’s research.

But to put that another way, the ground was so solidly packed with the interlocked skeletons of 17th-century victims of the Great Plague that the Tube’s 19th-century excavation teams couldn’t even hack their way through them all. The Tube thus had to swerve to the side along a subterranean detour in order to avoid this huge congested knot of skulls, ribs, legs, and arms tangled in the soil—an artificial geology made of people, caught in the throat of greater London."

prunescholar:

creepy romcom about two historians who meet during a year-and-a-half long course on Chalcolithic Mesopotamia: 500 days of Sumer

(via arganthone)

europeanarchitecture:

Temple of Vesta, Tivoli, Italy (by Roger B. Ulrich)

europeanarchitecture:

Temple of Vesta, Tivoli, Italy (by Roger B. Ulrich)

(via last-of-the-romans)